moral dillema

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northcliffbirder81
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moral dillema

Postby northcliffbirder81 » Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:50 pm

I'm feeling bad about what I've done. While me and my friend were walking in a park near my house, we were looking at the crowned plovers/lapwings, when we came across their chick. I asked my friend to go get my brother so that he could get my camera for me while I sat by the chick, as not to let it out of sight. He came back with it, when I realised that I had forgotten my memory card, so I ran to go get it. I came back and got the picture that I so badly wanted, feeling bad while the adults looked at us in desperation.
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we were about to go, when we found a second chick being eaten by ants. my brother made an artificial nest out of hay for the initial chick, so that he wouldn't freeze to death,and went to a nearby bench with the other one, so that he could pick all the ants off it. This was when we noticed that it had a bleeding beak (while he was coaxing the terrified chick, I was hoping that the adults would go back to their other one, they didn't.) We eventually went and put the chick back with his mate in their new nest. My brother reminded me in detail about how what I did was wrong, and that what he did was okay. this made me feel even worse. what must I do when the sun rises tomorrow? Will the adults still look after their chick. I don't know if they're the type of birds to neglect their second chick, if they do, what should I do with that one, leave it to nature? please help with this. I'm feeling quite bad, and my brother isn't making it better. Maybe a bit of information on their behaviour will help.



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gordon
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Re: moral dillema

Postby gordon » Wed Oct 15, 2014 11:10 pm

The general rule is to leave it to nature. A lot of species will abandon nest and chicks if they have been interfered with though sometimes they will come back and feed their young regardless.

Parents can also abandon sick or injured youngsters.

It can seem cruel to us but there are different rules for animals.

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northcliffbirder81
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Re: moral dillema

Postby northcliffbirder81 » Thu Oct 16, 2014 4:51 pm

well the adult plovers are still there. so I think they're still looking after their chick. Do you know for certain that they're one of those type of species that neglect their second one? Either way, I have al the pictures that I need of the plovers, and have also learnt that they live for up to 20 years. So if they haven't succeeded in raising their young this year (although I think they have). Then they will at least be able to next year. Should I do anything to protect them from domestic dogs and children.

northcliffbirder81
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Re: moral dillema

Postby northcliffbirder81 » Fri Oct 17, 2014 6:16 pm

confirmed, saw 3 chicks today! Annoyed to find that my brother picked one of them up, but still cheers all round, the plovers are living happily, and I've gotten all the pics I need! :D

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Re: moral dillema

Postby gordon » Tue Oct 21, 2014 1:02 am

That's great!

Of course you should try to teach your little brother to try and stay back from the birds and disturb them as little as possible. Not always easy though!

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Re: moral dillema

Postby berdie » Mon Apr 17, 2017 11:32 am

I think Everything should be natural


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