Guinea - amazing moth

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Guinea - amazing moth

Postby nkgray » Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:34 pm

This moth was flying around in late afternoon at least 2 hours before sunset and then took up residence on the verandah of the house here in N'Zerekore. It is only a medium-sized moth with a wingspan of 50-60mm, which makes those long wing streamers even more spectacular, especially in flight.

Can anyone tell me what it is, or at least point me at the right family so that I can do some digging to try and find out what it is?

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Neil


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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby Rusty Justy » Thu Nov 26, 2009 4:05 am

Wow, spectacular creature...............Looks similar to the green lunar moth we have in SA, just with longer streamers.........Prehaps its in the came Genus?! or atleast Family.....

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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby Jon » Thu Nov 26, 2009 6:24 am

looks like pennant winged moth (cousin of penant winged nightjar)?!

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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby gordon » Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:19 am

I wonder if it is related to the Moon Moths? They have those long wing streamers...
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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby gordon » Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:36 am

Hi Neil, I have sent a request for help to the British Natural History Museum. Let's see if they know what it is..

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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby nkgray » Thu Nov 26, 2009 7:47 am

Thanks, guys.

Have at least confined my web search to Saturniidae (Moon/Lunar/Comet moths) but with very little success so far.

Gordon - good to know you can send in requests to such a distinguished organisation as the Natural History Museum. Takes me back to my student days in 19**! I was at the Royal School of Mines. We had the Royal College of Music next to us, the Royal Albert Hall across the street and behind us on the opposite side of the city block (big block - it comprised the entire Imperial College and the Science Museum) was the Natural History Museum, where I spent many an hour.

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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby JGB » Thu Nov 26, 2009 12:33 pm

Neil,

I have received a reply on the ID query.

"The moth belongs to the family Saturniidae, the emperor moths. It probably belongs to the genus Antistathmoptera"

and

"This is an emperor moth (family Saturniidae), although not closely related to any member of the southern African fauna. The book Emperor Moths of the World by B. D'Abrera should yield a positive identification as it contains high-quality images of just about all species"

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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby JGB » Fri Nov 27, 2009 9:25 am

Hi Neil,

Have received another reply.

"This Saturniidae moth is Eustera brachyura, member of a small genus comprising only 3 species, the two others being E. argiphontes and E. troglophylla. The present one E. brachyura is widespread from Guinea to Congo and Gabon to the east. Larval foodplant is a leguminosacée Dialium guineense. This pink moth is the commonest of the 3 species.
Eustera argiphontes is a larger and rarer species grey-brownish coloured, with small "windows" unscaled at the discal area of the forewing. Larval foodplant is there Albizzia species. It is known from Guinea on the west to Ugande to the esat and to Angola to the south.
Eustera troglophylla is more or less intermediate between the two previous ones, its general tone variable between brown/purplish and brown/rusty. It is uncommon but widespread from Guinea again, to eastern RDC/ Congo (albert Lake) through Cameroon or Gabon. All three are wet forest dwellers.
D'abrera's books already issued do not deal this genus (Parts 1 and 3) and we don't know when part 2 will issue. Informations in French are available from IFAN XIV : Les lépidoptères de l'Afrique noire occidentale by P. C. ROUGEOT Fascicule 4 Saturniidae IFAN, Dakar 1962: to be found in Museum's libraries."

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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby nkgray » Fri Nov 27, 2009 9:35 am

Thanks for all the help. It is good to be able at least to put a scientific name to it.

Neil
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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby gordon » Wed Dec 23, 2009 4:49 am

Hi Neil,

I received a reply from the Museum on this:

Dear Gordon - this is Eudaemonia brachyura or a very similar species. (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae (Saturniinae))

HTH

Best regards,

Stuart Hine
Identification & Advisory Service

Angela Marmont Centre for UK Biodiversity
The Natural History Museum
Cromwell Road
London SW7 5BD

Tel: 020 7942 5045


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Re: Guinea - amazing moth

Postby Sorth » Sun Mar 06, 2016 7:04 pm

Hello all,
Newcomer here, seven years late to the discussion. I found my way here by following a trail that led from a picture of a similar moth from S. Africa which I found really baffling, as it was bright pink, and bore a lot of resemblances to various of the moon moths, for example as someone here pointed out, tailwings of the antistathmoptera and argema mittrei, and it has a similar shape to Actius dubernardi, which however comes from Vietnam! When I saw your picture I did a check on West African saturniids –– I think Stuart Hine is right, but based purely on the colour of the wings think the actual species might be Eudaemonia argus. Some think the two are the same species. The Eudaemonias are Saturniids should they be included among the glamorous moon moths? What do you think? best, Indra


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